Posts Tagged ‘low fat’

Strawberry and Banana Smoothie

Monday, July 2nd, 2012


1 banana

200ml low fat strawberry yoghurt

120ml low fat milk

120ml crushed ice


  1. Place all the ingredients in a blender or food processor.
  2. Blend for 30 seconds to a smooth, thick drink.
  3. Pour into a tall glass, add ice and strawberries to decorate if you wish.


Spinach Omelette

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Preparation - 5 minutes

Cooking time – 10 minutes

Serves 1


25g butter

60g baby spinach leaves

1 spring onion sliced

2 eggs, beaten

100g crumbled feta cheese

Salt and pepper

Fresh sage sprigs, to garnish

8 cherry tomatoes, grilled for serving



  1. Melt 15g butter in a non-stick pan, add the spinach, and stir until wilted. Season with salt and pepper to taste, then lift from the pan, and drain well. Chop half the spinach and keep the rest warm.
  2. Melt the remaining butter, add the spring onion, and stir-fry for 2-3 minutes. Add the eggs, season, and cook gently until the eggs are set.
  3. Fill the omelette with the chopped spinach and feta cheese then fold in half. Remove from the pan and top with the remaining spinach. Garnish with sage sprigs and serve with the tomatoes on the side.



Vegetarian Eating

Monday, March 12th, 2012

A well planned vegetarian diet can be nutritionally balanced for both adults and children however it is very important not to simply avoid animal products but to substitute them with nutritious alternatives such as dairy foods, eggs, pulses, nuts, seeds, and cereals.


There are 2 main types of vegetarians –


Lacto-ovo vegetarians.

Lacto-ovo vegetarians avoid meat, poultry and fish but eat eggs, milk and dairy products as well as cereals, vegetables, pulses, grains, seeds and nuts. The nutritional issues that these group face are similar to those following a conventional diet i.e. watch out for high fat, high salt. Choose mainly low fat cheese for example Edam, Gouda along with plenty of grains, vegetables, and fruits. Ensure you take an iron and folic acid supplement before during pregnancy as requirements are higher for these nutrients.



Vegans avoid meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk and dairy produce but eat cereals, fruit, vegetables, pulses, grains, seeds and nuts. Vegans have very different nutritional issues. Without any foods of animal origin getting enough calories to maintain a healthy weight can be difficult especially for growing children and nutrients such as Vitamin B12 and iron (needed for healthy red blood cells),Vitamin D and calcium (needed for healthy bones/teeth) and zinc (essential for healthy growth) all require special attention.


How to achieve a healthy vegetarian diet

The current healthy eating guidelines recommend that we reduce fat, sugar and salt in our diets and eat more fruit and vegetables; this can be achieved by a vegetarian diet. No single food contains all the nutrients that our bodies need so a variety is required.


Cereals, rice, potato and pasta group

6+ portions recommended/day. Choose fortified cereals to help with iron and Vitamin B12 intakes.

Fruit and vegetable group

5 or more recommended daily. Good sources of Vitamin A and C and folic acid.

Milk and dairy group.

The main nutrients supplied by this group are calcium, Vitamin B12, protein, energy and Vitamin A. Soya Milk and products are used by those following a vegan diet but ensure that the products you choose are fortified with calcium, to help meet your requirements.

The meat alternative group

This group includes peas, beans, lentils, tofu, nuts, seeds, textured vegetable protein, quorn cheese and eggs.

Fats and oil group

This group also contains sugar sweets confectionary, crisps, biscuits etc. Vegetarians who require a higher energy may need to include additional servings from this group.


Baked Cod with a Herby Crust

Monday, February 27th, 2012

Preparation time - Less than 30 minutes

Cooking time - 10 – 30 minutes

Serves 2


  • 2 x 180g pieces of cod fillet
  • 2 tbsp fresh wholemeal breadcrumbs
  • 2 tbsp mixed fresh herbs – chives, parsley, coriander – chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed finely
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • salt and pepper


  1. Heat the oven to 200oC.
  2. Mix together the herbs, garlic and oil. Stir in the breadcrumbs and season well.
  3. Spread this mixture over the fish.
  4. Put the fish on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 10-15 minutes until the flesh becomes opaque and flakes easily.


How to Eat Out Healthily on Valentine’s Day

Monday, February 13th, 2012

Valentine’s Day might mean that there is a chance you’ll be eating out. However, eating out usually means that we have little control over how the food is prepared or how large the portion is. Unlike packaged food, foods bought from cafes, restaurants etc. don’t have to carry nutritional information and so opting for the healthiest option might not always be easy. However, with these helpful tips eating out on Valentine’s Day can be both enjoyable and healthy!

General tips

  • Never arrive at a restaurant hungry!
  • Think ahead, if you know you’re eating out later, choose wisely earlier in the day to keep calories, fat, sugar and salt intakes under control.
  • Leave a little time for your food to digest before you order a dessert. Give your stomach time to send signals to your brain you are full (approx 20 minutes). If you still want a dessert, consider splitting it with one of your friends. Opt for sorbets, or fruit dishes to balance out a heavy main course.
  • Speak up about how you’d like a dish prepared e.g. ask for no mayonnaise.
  • You’re more likely to overeat at an ‘all you can eat’ style buffet.
  • Choose side orders of salad or vegetables to fill up on.
  • Cut off any visible fat from meat to keep saturated fat intake down.
  • Look out for smaller portions i.e. a main meal option as a starter size.
  • Opt for dishes which are grilled, baked, steamed, poached rather than fried.
  • Check the menu for dressings on salads and ask for it to be on the side. An otherwise healthy and nutritious salad could be drowned in a high fat sauce, bumping up its calorie content.
  • Avoid cheese, cream or butter-based sauces


How to Eat Your Way to Good Skin

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Golden rules to keep your skin looking youthful – the best way to do this is by choosing the right diet.

Eat your 5-a-day

Fruit and vegetables contain powerful antioxidants that help to protect against the cell damage caused by free radicals, which include smoking, pollution and sunlight. Vitamin C is one of the most powerful antioxidants. It is found in all fruit and vegetables but especially in citrus fruits, red peppers and kiwi fruit. Betacarotene, found in pumpkin, carrots, and sweet potatoes, and lutein, found in kale, papaya and spinach are also antioxidants.


Cut out crash diets

Repeatedly losing and regaining weight can take its toll on your skin, causing sagging, wrinkles and stretch marks. Crash diets are often short in essential vitamins, too.


Stock up on selenium

This is also a powerful antioxidant – studies suggest that a selenium-rich diet can help to protect against skin cancer, sun damage and age spots. One way to boost your intake is to eat brazil nuts, fish, shellfish and eggs.


Drink up

Even mild dehydration will cause your skin to look dry, tired and slightly grey. Drink at least six glasses of water a day – all fluids count towards your daily allowance, but water is the healthiest.


Don’t be afraid of fat

Good fats – the type found in avocados, nuts and seeds – provide essential fatty acids, which act as a natural moisturiser for your skin, keeping it supple.


Zap up your zinc

Zinc is involved in the normal functioning of the oil-producing glands in the skin, and also promotes skin healing. Zinc-rich foods include red meat, wholegrains, wheatgerm and shellfish.

College students – healthy eating tips

Monday, October 10th, 2011

When you go to college or university it may be the first time you’ve lived away from home and been fully independent. To have enough energy to study and enjoy student life to the full you need to eat regularly and healthily!

What does a healthy balanced diet really mean?

  • Eat regularly and base your meals on starchy foods
  • Eat lots of fruit and vegetables
  • Eat a wide variety of foods
  • Try to eat less salt
  • Cut down on saturated fats and sugars
  • Get active and try to be a healthy weight
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Don’t skip breakfast

Get organised

  • With some planning you can eat cheap and healthy meals on a tight budget
  • Make a shopping list before you go and shop
  • Watch your waste – when you buy foods that go off quickly, plan your meals carefully so it gets eaten or frozen straight away
  • Vary your meals otherwise you will get bored of eating and cooking the same things over and over again

What could you have in your food cupboard?

You need to stock your cupboard and fridge with easy to cook ingredients. Suggestions of meals include:

  • Soups – easy to make and nutritious especially if you add a lot of vegetables (fresh, frozen or canned).
  • Pasta – it’s quick and easy to cook and prepare. Keep pasta sauces in your cupboards and add your own flavours, vegetables etc. to it
  • Rice – mix cooked rice with leftover vegetables and meat
  • Bread is a good source of carbohydrate. Choose wholemeal bread rather than white as it is more nutritious and filling.
  • Potatoes – Baking potatoes are great value and versatile.
  • Porridge oats – cheap and it’s a really filling meal to start the day with. You could add some fresh or dried fruit for variety.
  • Beans and lentils – cheap to buy and a small amount goes a long way! Canned varieties can make a quick and nutritious addition to soups and stews. Lentils and beans can be used as a main meal with vegetables added. Baked beans on toast is a classic and is actually a very healthy dish, especially if you use wholemeal bread, and low fat spread.
  • Vegetables and fruit – can add vegetables to curries, soups, stir fries. Canned and frozen vegetables can be used as additions to last minute meals. Fruit is excellent for a quick nutritious snack. We should be eating at least 5 pieces of fruit and vegetables per day.
  • Condiments – add taste and flavour to your cooking. Keep a selection of dried herbs, spices, curry powder, vinegars, tomato sauce, soy sauce and stock cubes in your cupboard.
  • Tinned tomatoes – these can form the base of all sorts of sauces, are low in fat and count as a portion of your fruit and vegetables.
  • Chicken – chicken seems to be of better value if you buy in larger quantities. If you’ve got a freezer you could chop it up and freeze it in small amounts.
  • Eggs – are easy to cook and versatile.
  • Canned fish – Mackerel, sardines and pilchards are good sources of protein and omega 3 fatty acids.
  • Milk – full of calcium and vitamins and is healthy drink at any time of the day. Choose semi-skimmed or skimmed milk for a lower fat option.


Leek and Potato Soup

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Serves 6


Ingredients –

1 tbsp low fat spread

1 large onion, finely chopped

500g leeks, finely chopped

500g floury potatoes, peeled and chopped

3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

1 litre of hot vegetable stock

300ml skimmed milk

Salt and freshly ground pepper


Method –

  1. Melt the low fat spread in a large, lidded, non stick saucepan and gently sauté the onion and leeks until soft, about 10 minutes.
  2. Add the potatoes, parsley and hot stock and bring to the boil. Cover and reduce the heat. Simmer gently for about 20 minutes.
  3. Add the milk to the saucepan and reheat gently. Season to taste and serve garnished with parsley sprigs.


Tips for Eating Less Fat

Monday, August 29th, 2011

Eating too much fat increases amongst other things your risk of heart disease and encourages weight gain.

Research has shown that our diet generally contains too much fatty food and that we can all benefit from eating less fat.

Instead of getting our energy from starchy foods (carbohydrates) like bread and potatoes, we rely too much on foods that are high in animal fats such as red meat, butter and cheese.


Tips for reducing fat intake:

  • Choose lean meat. Trim all visible fat from meat and poultry prior to cooking.
  • Choose low fat milk; choose semi-skimmed or skimmed milks.
  • Choose low fat yoghurts.
  • Choose low fat spread.
  • Fry very occasionally using olive, sunflower or rapeseed oil. Choose grilling or baking instead.
  • Beware of the hidden fats in biscuits, cakes, chocolate, pastry and savoury snacks. Always read your food labels.
  • Fill up on fruit and vegetables.
  • Look out for low fat snacks, low fat yoghurt and fruit.
  • Use oven chips rather than fried.

Chicken Satay Skewers

Sunday, July 31st, 2011

Serves 4

Ingredients -

350g chicken breast, chopped into bite sized pieces

1 garlic clove, crushed

2 tbsp dark soy sauce

1 tsp dried chilli flakes

2 tbsp crunchy peanut butter

1 tbsp tomato puree

100ml pineapple juice


Method -

  1. Place the chicken in a shallow dish.
  2. Mix together the garlic, soy sauce, chilli flakes, peanut butter, tomato puree and pineapple juice. Pour the mixture over the chicken and toss well to coat all of the chicken pieces. Cover and leave to marinate for 30 minutes.
  3. Preheat the grill to high. Place the chicken pieces onto wooden skewers. Put them under the grill for 15 minutes, turning frequently, until evenly browned and cooked through.